> лимончики!
  1. theladybadass:

    1964 Japanese Coca Cola Ad

  2. kazi-is-amazing:

Mr. Krabs displays his mastery of alchemy by transmuting eight Krabby Patties into a single pizza, such is the law of equivalent exchange.

    kazi-is-amazing:

    Mr. Krabs displays his mastery of alchemy by transmuting eight Krabby Patties into a single pizza, such is the law of equivalent exchange.

  3. wehadfacesthen:

    fred-x-ginger:

    A kiss on the hand may be quite Continental…

    The way the dress dances as well …..

  4. vintagehandsomemen:

    1912, Titanic in colour. Colorised by Anton Logvynenko

    [ Via  Retronaut ]

  5. There’s just two problem dogs I take care of that I walk (or try to) back to back.  Both of them were former strays, so they only have about 2 people they trust— their moms, and their usual walker.  Of course both these people in these situations think their dogs are complete angels, so i end up feeling really terrible thinking about telling them that I don’t feel safe walking their dogs because their first thought will be “well what are you doing to my dog to make him want to bite you”, which is understandable, but it’s also really hurtful to say to somebody that desperately wants to do a good job and I almost get seriously injured every time getting leashes on, getting leashes off, and accidentally stepping too close to their favorite chew toys.  Of course, they’re dogs, they’re going to respond when they think they’re threatened.  And numerous visits to them hasn’t helped them get used to me. I just don’t want to do it anymore ): and I already promised this one lady that I’d take care of this dog (that went for my throat) while she was on vacation, and I don’t want to seem like I went back on my word.  But if I can’t even get a leash on this dog, I doubt I’d be able to walk him 3x daily and get close enough to his mouth that I can open it up to put his medication in there and get this, the owner said to do that, and then blow into his nose to get him to swallow.  No thanks.  I don’t want my face near that…

    There’s just two problem dogs I take care of that I walk (or try to) back to back. Both of them were former strays, so they only have about 2 people they trust— their moms, and their usual walker. Of course both these people in these situations think their dogs are complete angels, so i end up feeling really terrible thinking about telling them that I don’t feel safe walking their dogs because their first thought will be “well what are you doing to my dog to make him want to bite you”, which is understandable, but it’s also really hurtful to say to somebody that desperately wants to do a good job and I almost get seriously injured every time getting leashes on, getting leashes off, and accidentally stepping too close to their favorite chew toys. Of course, they’re dogs, they’re going to respond when they think they’re threatened. And numerous visits to them hasn’t helped them get used to me. I just don’t want to do it anymore ): and I already promised this one lady that I’d take care of this dog (that went for my throat) while she was on vacation, and I don’t want to seem like I went back on my word. But if I can’t even get a leash on this dog, I doubt I’d be able to walk him 3x daily and get close enough to his mouth that I can open it up to put his medication in there and get this, the owner said to do that, and then blow into his nose to get him to swallow. No thanks. I don’t want my face near that…

  6. spookyemporium:

    Begotten is a 1990 surreal horror experimental film written, produced and directed by E Elias Merhige. The film was shot entirely in black-and-white with no dialogue whatsoever. The film is basically a reimagining of the story of the Genesis. A (much shorter) Spiritual Sequel, Din of Celestial Birds, was released in 2006. 

    It was shot on black and white reversal film, and then every frame was rephotographed for the high-contrast look that it presents. Merhige said that for each minute of original film, it took up to 10 hours to rephotograph it for the look desired.

    The primary inspiration for the film came from a near-death experiment at the age of 19, after a car crash.

    Summary: The story opens with a robed, profusely bleeding “God” disemboweling himself, with the act ultimately ending in his death. A woman, Mother Earth, emerges from his remains, arouses the body, and impregnates herself with his semen. Becoming pregnant, she wanders off into a vast and barren landscape. The pregnancy manifests in a fully grown convulsing man whom she leaves to his own devices. The “Son of Earth” meets a group of faceless nomads who seize him with what is either a very long umbilical cord or a rope. The Son of Earth vomits organic pieces, and the nomads excitedly accept these as gifts. The nomads finally bring the man to a fire and burn him. “Mother Earth” encounters the resurrected man and comforts him. She seizes the man with a similar umbilical cord. The nomads appear and proceed to rape her. Son of Earth is left to mourn over the lifeless body. A group of characters appear, carry her off and dismember her, later returning for Son of Earth. After he, too, is dismembered, the group buries the remains, planting the parts into the crust of the earth. The burial site becomes lush with flowers.

    Watch Here:

    Begotten

    Din of Celestial Birds

  7. russian-style:

Valentin Serov - After suppression, 1905.
Here Tsar Nicholas II with a tennis racket under his arm (he was a passionate tennis player) awards the generals for suppressing the popular revolt. The row behind seems to be corpses, and the person in the carriage looks like the Tsarina.
During the first russian revolution Serov made several critical drawings. Serov did not support authority’s actions though he  portrayed the members of the imperial family several years before that. (And since 1905 he refused such offers). 

    russian-style:

    Valentin Serov - After suppression, 1905.

    Here Tsar Nicholas II with a tennis racket under his arm (he was a passionate tennis player) awards the generals for suppressing the popular revolt. The row behind seems to be corpses, and the person in the carriage looks like the Tsarina.

    During the first russian revolution Serov made several critical drawings. Serov did not support authority’s actions though he  portrayed the members of the imperial family several years before that. (And since 1905 he refused such offers). 

About me

Senior history undergrad who wants to study social and urban history of Eastern and Central Imperial Europe. Loves pups, turn of the century Russian criminal music, and the color gold.